Almonds Are Really Really Good for You

Almonds and chocolateFebruary 16th is National Almond Day. If you missed it, that’s OK. Still, the Almond Board of California used the opportunity to tell us all once again why almonds are great for us. Nine reasons are given, citing 9 studies, almost all of them suggesting that almonds can help you lower cholesterol. I can attest that my cholesterol has dropped since I started eating raw almonds daily. I can’t say for sure that’s the reason, but since my diet wasn’t especially changed, it’s the only one I could think of. Among the studies cited by the Almond Board.

  1. 100 grams of almonds a day added to the diet reduced cholesterol.
  2. Almonds lower LDL cholesterol while maintaining the good HDL.
  3. Almonds assist with LDL oxidization and plasma lipids in both men and women.
  4. Almonds used as snacks in the diets of hyperlipidemic subjects significantly reduce coronary heart disease risk factors.
  5. Almond-enriched diets do not alter insulin sensitivity in healthy adults or glycemia in patients with diabetes. Almonds show beneficial effects on serum lipids in healthy adults and produced changes similar to high monounsaturated fat oils in diabetic patients.
In the meantime, have a look at a couple tasty almond recipes.

Source

 

http://magnesiumrichfoods.com/magnesium-rich-recipes/almond-recipes/

Magnesium Foods and Cardiovascular Health

Dietary Magnesium and Magnesum SupplementsA whole slew of news reports have recently covered two studies of the effects of dietary magnesium on cardiovascular health and strokes. It’s certainly good news, as it shows a clear connection between dietary magnesium intake and the two. The problem with the new reports, though, is that many of them simply say magnesium intake and leave the “dietary” part off. This is a big mistake.

People who read these reports may rush out and buy magnesium supplements to improve their cardiovascular performance. And that’s not a good idea, because there was nothing in the studies to connect magnesium supplements to cardiovascular improvement and reduce risk of stroke. The studies specifically looked at dietary magnesium, which means increased magnesium from eating magnesium rich foods.

Now the good news, if you are one of those who are ready to eat magnesium foods rather than popping pills.

In seven prospective studies, with 6477 cases of stroke and 241,378 participants researchers observed

…a modest but statistically significant inverse association between magnesium intake and risk of stroke. An intake increment of 100 mg Mg/d was associated with an 8% reduction in risk of total stroke (combined RR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.88, 0.97), without heterogeneity among studies (P = 0.66, I2 = 0%). Magnesium intake was inversely associated with risk of ischemic stroke…

Again, this 100mg per day hasn’t been shown to work if you get it from a supplement. To get the effects noted in this study you need to get that 100mg of magnesium from food. It’s about 100 pumpkin seeds, 33 almonds, or a small serving of fish or spinach.

There are times when magnesium supplements have been shown to be effective, but this is not one of them. Be very careful when you use magnesium to treat a certain health issue, as in some cases the supplements to not have the efficacy of dietary magnesium. Don’t rely one blogs (not even this one) to give you this info. Look for the source of the study cited. Copy and paste it into Google, and read the abstract for yourself. It will take all of a minute or two. Make sure the study specifies either supplements or dietary magnesium. If it doesn’t, then it’s safer to assume that only dietary magnesium will work, as that’s often the case.

This particular abstract (Dietary magnesium intake and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective studies1,2,3,4, Susanna C Larsson, Nicola Orsini, and Alicja Wolk) can be found at the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

be found here.